Formula 1 to Bring Back Refueling, Promises Faster Cars in 2017

May 15, 2015 05:22 PM EDT | Matt Mercuro

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In an effort to make races more exciting, bosses for Formula One racing have agreed to bring back louder engines and refueling during races.

Let's face it, F1 isn't what it once was. Cars used to be a lot faster, to the point where drivers are now complaining. Getting rid of refueling during races in 2009 was just a bad idea altogether, though it seems the higher-ups for F1 have changed their minds.

In 2017 cars will no longer be allowed to start a race with a full fuel load and vehicles will be about "five to six seconds a lap faster," according to Formula1.com.

The changes were decided by the F1 Strategy Group during a meeting on Thursday. Those in attendance include FIA president Jean Todt, F1 group CEO Bernie Ecclestone and the Ferrari, Mercedes, McLaren, Red Bull, Williams and Force India teams.

A number of major engine manufacturers also helped decide the new changes as well, according to BBC News.

"In light of the various scenarios presented by the independent consulting company mandated by the F1 strategy group, at the initiative of the FIA, to work on the reduction of costs and following a constructive exchange, a comprehensive proposal to ensure the sustainability of the sport has emerged," said the FIA in a press statement.

So how does the group plan on making cars louder, yet faster? By using wider tires, updating aerodynamic regulations and reducing the overall weight.

A request to allow drivers to use five engines, instead of four, was rejected during the meeting "in consideration of the investments of the manufacturers involved in the sport and to give visibility to potential new entrants," according to FIA.

The return of refueling won't change the max race allotment of 22 gallons, but that could be updated at a later time.

Now the changes will have to be approved by two legislative stages and if all goes well F1 races will be a lot more exciting in two year's time.

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