Volvo's EV Will Be Built In China And Will Be Arriving In 2019

Apr 21, 2017 11:27 AM EDT | Anthony Hunter

First Volvo EV Will Have at Least 250 Miles of Range

Volvo confirmed this week that it will build its first electric car in China and that it will offer the vehicle globally.
(Photo : Youtube/Autowhiz)

Volvo recently announced in Shanghai that the company's first mass-produced electric vehicle for consumers would be arriving in 2019. The automaker said that it would be built in China and the model will be offered worldwide.

The China-built EV will be using a version of Volvo's Compact Modular Architecture. It's the same platform as the company's larger Scalable Product Architecture for the 90 Series models, and the parts are close enough for products on each one to share a few parts. The automaker is currently using a CMA on the new XC60, and more cars with the underpinnings are on the way in the 40 and 60 Series.

Henrick Green, Volvo's recently appointed boss of Research and Development, said, "We are full speed now developing our first full EV to launch in 2019, and it will be followed up. It will not be a one-off project, and it will be followed up by further products down the line. Right now we have the plug-in hybrid which we believe is a very strong transitional product."

Earlier this year, the automaker and Geely, its Chinese owner, said that the EV would have a 100-kilowatt-hour battery capacity, and later some reports claimed a driving range of at least 250 miles (402 km) on a charge. In addition, some of these future vehicles will also be offered on the SPA platform. Volvo will be required to proliferate on this tech right away because it will aim to have a million electric vehicles on the road by 2025.

Furthermore, Volvo chose China as the production location since it's the world biggest market for electric vehicles. Major growth in the segment could speed up there as China's government has stricter rules for regulating air quality. Also, China's leaders currently want 40 percent of traffic to be plug-in hybrids, EV's, or models with hydrogen fuel cells by the year 2030, which would sum up to 15.2 million vehicles.

 

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