Autoliv To Recall Defective Seat Belts And Airbags; Recall Might Affect Around 400,000 Vehicles Worldwide [VIDEO]

Dec 26, 2016 07:00 AM EST | Leonora Puno

Autoliv, a Swedish-American company that makes safety technology products, revealed that it might recall around 400,000 vehicles fitted with seatbelts and airbags that have defective parts made between April 10 and Oct. 15 of this year.  Several automakers buy seat belts and airbags from Autoliv, but it has not yet released the names of automakers that might've fitted vehicles with the defective seatbelts and airbags. 

The impending recall was announced after Autoliv filed at the US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) for a recall of seatbelts and airbags that might malfunction. Although no accidents involving defective seatbelts or airbags had been reported yet, the move will be taken to ensure the 100 percent safety of car drivers and passengers. Autoliv understands that it is its responsibility to make the recall, which it hopes will not have a drastic impact on its finances, according to Automotive News.

Around 1,300 vehicles had been fitted with the seatbelts and airbags under question but no automakers were specified yet by Autoliv. During a test conducted, it was found that the micro gas generators which are used as seat belt pretensioners might get detached and act like a projectile, injuring people inside the car. In the case of the airbags, it was discovered during the testing that the part that initiates the inflation of the airbag may also get detached and harm people in the vehicle, according to Reuters.

It can be recalled that several deaths were recorded due to a malfunctioning airbag supplied by Takata, which was ordered to recall millions of airbags from several automakers. Several deaths happened after the recall was announced, proving that disregarding recalls can be a serious mistake, according to Consumer Reports.

As long as people whose vehicles are included in the recall stop using there cars, accidents caused by the defective parts will be avoided.

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