Google Street View Car Caught Overspeeding: Some Recommending To Change Name Into Google Speed View?

Dec 02, 2016 03:50 AM EST | Jessie Valenzuela

2010 CeBIT Technology Fair

HANNOVER, GERMANY - MARCH 03: A German Google Street View car standing on display at the CeBIT Technology Fair on March 3, 2010 in Hannover, Germany.
(Photo : Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

Google Street View, infamous online platform displaying scenic views in multiple angles via cars roaming around the streets of the United Kingdom and across the globe, has been caught overspeeding at Worcester Road in July.

On a picture captured and uploaded online via Street View along Worcester Road, Kemsey Village in the United Kingdom, the Google Street View car receives a warning that it already violated the 30 mph speed limit. This was indicated by a sign flashing on that image.

While it may seem funny to some, it was saddening for Google Street View as the image got viral and exposed all over the world. This untoward occurrence last July was taken by Google itself via tech onboard cameras. It has also been said that the car was found running at 35 mph or faster, according to Mirror.

How did it happen and posted online without Street View's notice and control?

Outlining the purpose of Google Street View's car system, the car is designed and sent to roam around streets ---taking images of roads and bringing captured ones together for real-time viewing by anyone online worldwide. However, the incident has become a laughing stock. There are even conversations recommending the change of Google Street View's name into Google Speed View.

The District Director of Kempsey, David Harrison, stated in an interview with Worcester News that its own captured image caused incrimination to Google Street View itself. He also confirmed that the Street View car, on a 30 mph zone, went beyond the 35 mph mark, CNET reported.

If we look back on the local district's record, statistics shows that Kempsey has been struggling with alacrity of car owners for almost seven years now. In 2009, authorities recorded around 31,000 overspeeding incidences in just a month via temporary speed indicator signs set up and tested out.

Do they really need to change Google Street View's name? Well, let's just wait for Google to say anything about the evidence presented against them for this incident. 

© 2016 Auto World News, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.
Get the Most Popular Autoworld Stories in a Weekly Newsletter
`

Join the Conversation

© Copyright 2016 AUTO WORLD NEWS All rights reserved.

Real Time Analytics